Conditions Treated

Conditions Treated

Aortic Valvar Stenosis (AS) in Children

Arrhythmias in Children

Atrial Septal Defect (ASD) in Children

Atrioventricular Canal Defect (AV Canal) in Children

Cardiomyopathy in Children

Chest Pain in Children

Coarctation of the Aorta in Children

Congenital Heart Disease in Children

Fainting (“Syncope”) in Children

Heart Murmurs in Children

Heart Palpitations in Children

High Blood Pressure (“Hypertension”) in Children

Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome

Myocarditis in Children

Pulmonary Atresia in Children

Pulmonary Valve Stenosis in Children

Tetralogy of Fallot in Children

Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return in Children

Transposition of the Great Arteries in Children

Truncus Arteriosus in Children

Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD) in Children

When you first learn that your child has a heart condition, you want information quickly. There is so much on the web that it’s hard to tell which information is reliable and useful as you make decisions about your child’s care. In this section, you can search by condition to learn more about your child’s diagnosis, with links to the related resources you’ll find at the Phoenix Children’s Heart Center.

Aortic Valvar Stenosis (AS) in Children

Aortic stenosis is a heart defect that may be present at birth (“congenital”) or develop later in life (“acquired”). If a baby is born with AS, then something disrupted the aortic valve’s normal development during the first eight weeks of pregnancy. Located between the left ventricle and aorta, the aortic valve has three leaflets...

Read More >

Arrhythmias in Children

An arrhythmia (or “dysrhythmia”) is an abnormal heart rhythm that can cause the heart to pump less effectively. Arrhythmias can cause problems with contractions of the heart chambers by: Not allowing the ventricles (lower chambers) to fill with an adequate amount of blood, due to an abnormal electrical...

Read More >

Atrial Septal Defect (ASD) in Children

The heart has two sides, separated by an inner wall called the septum. A hole in the septum between the heart’s two upper chambers (or “atria”) is called an atrial septal defect. This congenital (present at birth) heart defect occurs when normal heart development is disrupted during the first eight weeks of pregnancy...

Read More >

Atrioventricular Canal Defect (AV Canal) in Children

An atrioventricular canal defect (AV canal) is a congenital (present at birth) heart defect that is also known as an endocardial cushion defect or atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD). The defect occurs during the first eight weeks of pregnancy, when something disrupts the heart’s normal development, resulting in a complex...

Read More >

Cardiomyopathy in Children

The word “cardiomyopathy” refers to diseases of the heart muscle that have many causes, signs and symptoms, and treatments. The heart muscle becomes enlarged, thick or rigid in cardiomyopathy, making it impossible for the heart to pump blood effectively. For some children, the heart rhythm becomes...

Read More >

Chest Pain in Children

Unlike adults, chest pain in children is rarely a sign of serious heart trouble. Its symptoms differ widely, depending on the cause. Causes: Children can experience chest pain due to many things, from asthma to a pulled muscle. One of the most common causes of children’s chest pain is a harmless condition...

Read More >

Return to Top

Coarctation of the Aorta in Children

The aorta is the major blood vessel that carries blood away from the heart to the body. When a child has coarctation of the aorta, the aorta is narrowed at some point. The aorta is shaped like a candy cane. The first section moves up toward the head (ascending aorta), then curves into a C-shape as smaller arteries...

Read More >

Congenital Heart Disease in Children

Congenital heart defects are problems with the heart’s structure — interior walls, valves and arteries and veins — that are present at birth. The defects change the normal flow of blood through the heart. A baby's heart begins to develop at conception, but is completely formed by the eighth week of pregnancy...

Read More >

Fainting (“Syncope”) in Children

Syncope is a medical term used to describe a temporary loss of consciousness due to the sudden decline of blood flow the brain. In layman’s terms, syncope is commonly called fainting or “passing out.” If a child is about to faint, he or she will feel dizzy, lightheaded or nauseous. The child’s field of vision may...

Read More >

Heart Murmurs in Children

A heart murmur is an extra or unusual sound heard during a heartbeat that is made by blood circulating through the heart's chambers or valves, or through blood vessels near the heart. Murmurs can range from very faint to very loud and sometimes make a whooshing or swishing noise. The two major categories...

Read More >

Heart Palpitations in Children

A heart palpitation brings an uneasy feeling that the heart is beating irregularly — whether it’s thumping, pounding, skipping, flopping, stopping, jumping or racing. A child may have difficulty putting into words what he or she is feeling during a heart palpitation. Some children may notice this odd sensation during...

Read More >

Return to Top

High Blood Pressure (“Hypertension”) in Children

High blood pressure (also called “hypertension”) is a serious condition that can lead to coronary heart disease, heart failure, stroke, kidney failure and other health problems. “Blood pressure” is the force of blood pushing against the walls of the arteries as the heart pumps blood and is measured systolic and diastolic...

Read More >

Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome

Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a severe cardiovascular malformation that is a leading cause of infant mortality. In HLHS, the left side of the heart is underdeveloped and the aortic and mitral valves are narrowed or closed completely, impairing the heart’s ability to supply oxygen-rich blood to a child’s...

Read More >

Myocarditis in Children

Myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle, which rarely occurs in young children. The condition tends to be more severe in newborns and young infants than in children over age two. Causes: In children, the most common cause of myocarditis is a virus that has reached the heart such as; a flu virus...

Read More >

Pulmonary Atresia in Children

Pulmonary atresia (PA) is a complicated congenital (present at birth) defect that occurs due to abnormal development of the fetal heart during the first eight weeks of pregnancy. The pulmonary valve is found between the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery. It has three leaflets that function like a one-way....

Read More >

Pulmonary Valve Stenosis in Children

Pulmonary valve stenosis is a heart valve disorder involving the pulmonary valve, which separates the right ventricle (lower right chamber of the heart) and the pulmonary artery. This congenital (present at birth) heart defect occurs due to abnormal development of the fetal heart during the first eight weeks of pregnancy...

Read More >

Tetralogy of Fallot in Children

Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF or "TET") is a rare, complex heart defect that is present at birth (or “congenital”). A problem with the structure of the heart, it changes the normal flow of blood through the heart. The word “tetralogy” refers to four heart defects: Ventricular septal defect (VSD). An opening in the dividing...

Read More >

Return to Top

Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return in Children

Total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR) is a heart disease that is present at birth (or “congenital”) in which none of the four veins that take blood from the lungs to the heart is attached to the left atrium (left upper chamber of the heart). In a normal heart, oxygen-poor (blue) blood returns to the right atrium from...

Read More >

Transposition of the Great Arteries in Children

Transposition of the great arteries (TGA) is a heart defect that occurs from birth (“congenital”). The two major vessels that carry blood away from the heart — the aorta and pulmonary artery — are switched (transposed). In a normal heart, oxygen-poor (blue) blood returns to the right atrium from the body, travels to the right...

Read More >

Truncus Arteriosus in Children

Truncus arteriosus is a rare type of heart disease that occurs at birth (or is “congenital”) in which a single blood vessel (truncus arteriosus) emerges from the right and left ventricles, instead of the normal two vessels, the pulmonary artery and aorta. The defect occurs due to abnormal development of the fetal heart...

Read More >

Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD) in Children

A ventricular septal defect (VSD) is a hole in the part of the dividing wall (or “septum”) that separates the ventricles, the lower chambers of the heart. VSD is a congenital (present at birth) heart defect. As the fetus grows, something occurs to affect heart development during the first eight weeks of pregnancy, resulting...

Read More >

Return to Top

Share this page: 

|